Welcome to my blog

Acupuncture specialist for Fertility, Facial rejuvenation, Pain relief, Fatigue.
Based at Harley Street and Kensington Central London.Qualified as a medical doctor in Western medicine in China with a Medical degree from Beijing, China and a PhD degree from the UK. Over 25 year research and clinical experiences

Doctor who is passionate about acupuncture

I love what I do, I am good at it and I am always there for my patients. If you come and see me, you will know why I am standing out.
This blog is to introduce latest development and research of acupuncture and offer a chance of awareness of more treatment options for your condition. The blog is for information purpose only.

About Me

My photo

My specialised areas include fertility, facial rejuvenation, acne, vulvodynia, various pain conditions, chronic fatigue, neurological conditions, digestive problems

Practice contact for appointments and addresses 

Kensington: for appointments at Anamaya center Kensington (Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays) please call at 02030110355 or email at info@anamaya.co.uk
Address: 1 Adam and Eve Mews, Kensington, London W8 6UG
2 min walk from High Street Kensington underground station

Harley Street: for appointments  at Harley Street (Wednesdays) please call ALO clinic at 02076368845 or email at info@aloclinic.com
Address
Suite 3 Harmont House
20 Harley Street, London W1G 9PH
5 min walk from Oxford Circus underground station

My background: I became a qualified medical doctor 25 years ago in Western medicine  in China and was well trained in Western medicine together with Chinese medicine in the best Medical University in Beijing, China. Particularly I was trained with Dr Zheren Xuan--famous orthopedics expert and founder of soft tissue surgery in China. Furthermore I had training in dermatology and oral and maxilofacial surgery in China. Also I had training in fertility and had research experiences in uterine smooth muscles and blood vessels in China and the UK. I am dedicated to treat patients with acupuncture and am recognised as one of the world leading acupuncture specialists.

I obtained a PhD degree in the University of Leeds in the UK.
I had post doctoral training and worked as a senior researcher in St George's hospital, London, UK.
I had frequently presented my research findings in the top international conferences in the field.
I have many publications including ebooks and articles.

I have many year clinical experiences. Over the years of practising, I have developed unique treatment approaches for infertility, skin aging, acne, vulvodynia, bladder pain, neck pain, headache, migraine, shoulder pain, back pain, fatigue, hot flushes, nerve pain, chronic prostatitis, Parkison's disease, MS, acid reflex, IBS etc to achieve best treatment results. 

My devotion and skills are highly praised by my patients. 

My eBooks

Know your ovary to get pregnant
Know fertility and acupuncture to get pregnant
Vulvodynia, is vulval pain in your mind
Energy fatigue and acupuncture
Headaches, Neck pain and shoulder pain

Tuesday, 24 June 2014

Acupuncture helps improving foot drop

Foot drop, sometimes called drop foot is a muscular weakness or paralysis that makes it difficult to lift the front part of your foot and toes. This causes the toes to drag along the ground while walking. To avoid dragging the toes, people with foot drop may lift their knee higher than normal. Or they may swing their leg in a wide arc. Foot drop can happen to one foot or both feet at the same time. Foot drop is a symptom rather than a condition. The causes could be muscle disorders, nerve damage in the leg, or brain and/or spinal injury. Muscles disorders including muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and polio cause the muscles to progressively weaken causing foot drop. Some conditions including sports injuries, diabetes, spending long hours sitting cross-legged or squatting, hip or knee replacement surgery, childbirth etc could cause peroneal nerve damage or compressed causing foot drop. Brain or spinal disorders including stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS) and cerebral palsy also can cause foot drop.

The treatments depend on the causes of the foot drop which include physiotherapy, wearing an ankle-foot orthosis, electrical nerve stimulation and surgery. Acupuncture was also reported to be useful to help improving foot drop.

References
Jagirdar PC Indian J Lepr (1986 58:618-22
Liu ZP et al Zhongguoe Zhen Jiu (2012) 32:293-6

Monday, 16 June 2014

Tailbone pain, acupuncture can help

Tailbone pain, acupuncture can help

The medical term of tailbone pain is coccydynia. It is caused by inflammation of tail bone area. It presents with pain and tenderness at the tip of the tailbone between the buttocks. The pain is often worsened by sitting. Tailbone pain is often caused by an injury, such as sitting for a long time or bike rides, but it may have unknown causes. Vaginal birth in women sometimes is the cause tailbone pain. The coccyx or pelvic bones injury is a risk factor and obesity is also a risk factor for getting tailbone pain. Secondary tailbone pain includes sciatica, infection such as shingles of the buttocks, pilonidal cysts, sacroiliitis, and fractured bone. The major symptoms are pain and local tenderness at the tailbone. This can lead to difficulty sitting or leaning against the buttocks. Along with the pain with sitting, there is typical tenderness at the tailbone area. Treatments include rest and sitting on a pillow, cushion, or buttock support; avoiding reinjury to the affected area, anti-inflammatory pain killers; cortisone injection; physical therapy with exercises and last not the least acupuncture.

Slipped disc treated with acupuncture

A slipped disc or prolapsed or herniated disc is a condition in which the disc in the spine is torn and the central part inside leaks out. It causes chronic back pain. The pain is often begins in the lower back and over time it spreads to other parts of the body. Sometime there is no symptom. This is because the slipped part of the disc is small which will not affect nerves or spinal cord. If sciatic nerve is affected the pain could travel from the back of the pelvis, through the buttocks and down the legs to the feet. It could be also accompanied with numbness, tingling sensation in legs. Muscle paralysis, muscle spasms and urinary incontinence are also common symptoms. If the nerves at the very bottom of the spinal cord become compressed, it causes cauda equina syndrome. The symptoms include lower back pain, numbness in the groin area, paralysis of one or both legs, rectal pain, bowel disturbance, inability to pass urine or incontinence and pain in the inside of the thighs. The interventions for slipped discs include acupuncture, advice to stay active, analgesics, antidepressants, bed rest, corticosteroids (epidural injections), cytokine inhibitors (infliximab), discectomy (automated percutaneous, laser, microdiscectomy, standard), exercise therapy, heat, ice, massage, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), percutaneous disc decompression, spinal manipulation, and traction.

A recent study has shown that acupuncture had better effects than that of Fugui Gutong capsule and ibuprofen for slipped disc. The scores of clincial symptoms and therapeutic effect were observed before and after treatment. Results In the electroacupuncture group, the effective rate was 84.4% (38/45), which was superior to that of 65.0% (26/40) in the medication group. After treatment, the scores of symptoms significantly decreased in the two groups, and the reduction of scores in electroacupuncture group was superior to that in medication group.

Which acupuncture points are used to treat slipped discs? A study analysed data from recent 10 years. They found 49 main acupuncture points from 173 studies. there were 10 most common used acupoints on Bladder Meridian [Geshu (BL 17), Xiaochangshu (BL 27), Shenshu (BL 23), Dachangshu (BL 25), Pangguangshu (BL 28), Guanyuanshu (BL 26), Weizbong (BL 40), Zhibian (BL 54), Chengshan (BL 57), Kunlun (BL 60)], 2 on Gallbladder Meridian [Huantiao (GB 30), Yanglingquan (GB 34)], 2 on Governor Vessel [Yaoyangguan (GV 3), Shuigou (GV 26)], 2 on Stomach Meridian [Zusanli (ST 36), Juliao (ST 3)], 2 on Spleen Meridian [Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Xuehai (SP 10)], and the rest were extra points (Huatuo Jiaji) and Ashi points, so a conclusion could be drawn that the most common used acupoints were Bladder Meridian acupoints and supplemented by Gallbladder Meridian, Governor Vessel, Stomach Meridian, Spleen Meridian, extra points and Ashi points. The selected acupoints were most located on the lumbosacral region, leg and fewer located on the face, back and local part.

Acupuncture is effective for sciatic pain.

Sciatica is pain caused by irritating sciatic nerve. Sciatic nerve is the longest nerve in the body and it runs from the back of your pelvis, through your buttocks, and all the way down both legs, ending at your feet. Sciatic pain can range from being mild to very painful and may last just a few days or for months. The pain of sciatica radiates out from the lower back, down the buttocks and into one or both of the legs, right down to the calf. The pain often gets worse over time and may also be made worse by: sneezing, coughing or laughing, standing or sitting for a long period of time, bending backwards. The accompanied symptoms can include numbness, tingling, muscle weakness, loss of tendon reflexes. The study was funded by the UK National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment program compared clinical effectiveness of management strategies for sciatica and it has shown that there was a statistically significant improvement following disc surgery, epidural injections, nonopioid analgesia, manipulation, and acupuncture. This study has provided new data to assist shared decision-making. The findings support the effectiveness of nonopioid medication, epidural injections, and disc surgery. They also suggest that spinal manipulation, acupuncture, and experimental treatments, such as anti-inflammatory biological agents, may be considered. The findings do not provide support for the effectiveness of opioid analgesia, bed rest, exercise therapy, education/advice (when used alone), percutaneous discectomy, or traction.

How can acupuncture help sciatic pain? First of all acupuncture increasing sciatic nerve blood flow was suggested. Secondly acupuncture improves nerve conduction. Finally acupuncture resumes brain activity in patients with sciatica.

Acupuncture reduces leg pain

Leg pain can be mild that comes and goes, or severe that makes it difficult to sleep and walk. The pain is often described as aching, throbbing or burning and it can be accompanied by numbness, tingling and muscle weakness. Leg pain can develop from leg injury, over exercise, tear or overuse. Problems that affect the blood vessels can also cause leg pain. These include peripheral arterial disorder, inflammation of a vein or blood clot etc. Another common cause of leg pain is the problem of low back where the nerve to the leg originates and then travels to the legs. For leg pain treatments, finding the cause is important and treatments depend on the causes. Acupuncture is used for the leg pain management.

References

Grgic V Lijec Viesn (2012) 134:49-55

Gataullin IG and Samitov Osh Khirurgiia (Mosk) (1989) 2:64-6

Jordan J et al Clin Evid (Online) (2011) pii:118

Shan YL Zhongguo Zhen Jiu (2011) 31:987-90

Li JB et al Zhongguo Zhen Jiu (2013) 33:668-72

Lewis RA et al Spine J (2013)pii:1529-9430

Inoue M et al Evid Based Complemnet ALternat Med (2008) 5:133-43

Schroder S et al Eur J Neurol (2007) 14:276-81

Li J et al Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi (2012) 32:1624-7

Wednesday, 11 June 2014

Acupuncture is effective for diabetic and idiopathic peripheral neuropathy

Acupuncture is effective for diabetic peripheral neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathy is that the nerves in the patients with diabetes were damaged which is caused by high blood sugar levels and decreased blood flow. In a high blood sugar environment nerve cells as well as repair mechanisms are more likely to be damaged. About 50% of patients with diabetes will develop nerve damage many years later after they have been diagnosed diabetes. Many nerves could be affected including cranial nerves (nerves in the skull), autonomic nerves (nerves for internal organs such as heart, stomach etc) and of course peripheral nerves (for instance, nerves for arms and legs). Symptoms may vary depending on which nerves are injured

If peripheral nerves (nerves for the arms and legs) are damaged, this is called peripheral neuropathy which occurs in 50% of the diabetes 2 patients. The early sign of peripheral nerve damage is abnormal sensation such as pain and numbness often started in the toes and feet. The symptoms tingling and burning pain and numbness could be present in the arms and legs. Some pain could be very severe. The nerve conduction became slow. Foot ulcer may occur because of poor blood supply to the skin. The symptoms are worsening with times and age.

The treatment for diabetic peripheral neuropathy included two aspects: first is to keep blood sugar controlled in a normal level to prevent further nerve damage; second is to reduce symptoms. Many medicines are available to relive pain symptoms. Long term use of these medicines could cause kidney damage. Recently there are many studies supporting using acupuncture for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy.

Recent research by Chinese clinicians showed that acupuncture helps improving symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Chen etc (2009) and Ji XQ (2010) used randomized controlled trials to study effect of acupuncture on nerve conduction velocity in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. They found that acupuncture significantly increased nerve conduction speed. Tong Y (2010) etc compared the effect of acupuncture in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy with that of sham acupuncture using randomised trials. After 15 sessions of acupuncture treatment, acupuncture significantly improved nerve conduction speed; acupuncture also significantly improved numbness, pain and rigidity in the arms and legs; vibration and temperature sensations were improved after acupuncture treatment. As we already know that acupuncture has analgesic effect and also acupuncture improves local blood flow, these could contribute to the effectiveness of the treatment.

Positive result of acupuncture in the treatment of diabetic painful neuropathy from Manchester

Role of acupuncture in the management of diabetic painful neuropathy (DPN) was studied by Garrow AP et al in Tameside Hospital NHS foundation Trust, Diabetes Center in greater Manchester UK. In this study, there were 45 patients involved and allocated to two groups real acupuncture group and sham acupuncture group which is a control group. A 10 week course acupuncture was offered to these patients and five standardised acupuncture points on the lower limb of each leg were used in the study: LR3, KI3, SP6, SP10 and ST36. Assessment was done before and after acupuncture treatments. Over the 10-week treatment period, small improvements were seen in Visual Analogue Scale which was used to assess lower limb pain, Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile and resting diastolic blood pressure in the true acupuncture group and little changes were in sham acupuncture group. They demonstrated the potential practicality and feasibility of acupuncture as an additional treatment for people with DPN. Acupuncture treatment was well tolerated with little side effects.

Peripheral nerve injury with acupuncture treatment

Peripheral nerve injury can occur through various traumas and it became increasingly common condition. Injury to motor nerves may produce symptoms including muscle weakness, atrophy, twitching and paralysis. Injury to sensory nerve may produce symptoms including continuous burning pain, sensitivity, numbness, tingling or pricking and problems with positional awareness. A first degree injury or neuraplaxia will recover quickly within a few months. The recovery will be completed with no lasting muscle or sensory problem. More severe injuries may take longer to recover completely or may not be fully recovered. The recovery depends on the severity of the injury and the time to get the treatment. Nerve injuries should be treated as early as possible. Apart from surgical treatment, nonsurgical treatments for nerve injuries include medication, massage therapy, orthotics, physical therapy and acupuncture. Studies showed that acupuncture has significantly better effect for nerve injuries than those without acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture provided immediate symptom relief for patients with peripheral nerve injuries. Acupuncture has effect to reduce pain sensation. Acupuncture also improves motor nerve recovery. In addition acupuncture improves nerve conduction over the period of treatment and has been shown effective for nerve repair. This indicates that acupuncture may help nerves regeneration. Acupuncture is a promising approach for nonsurgical treatment of peripheral nerve injuries.

Acupuncture helps with peripheral neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy is a condition affecting nerves causing impaired sensation, movement, or other organ dysfunction. There are many factors causing the condition, such as diabetes, vitamin deficiency, medication, injury or infection etc. If the cause is unknown, this is called idiopathic neuropathy. The symptoms depend on which nerves are affected. For example, if motor nerves are affected, it could present painful cramps, muscle twitching, muscle weekness, muscle loss, bone degeneration, impaired balance and coordination. If sensory nerves are affected, it may present numbness, loss of sensation, poor balance and coordination, tingling, burning pain etc. If autonomic nerves are affected, it may present poor bladder control, abnormal blood pressure and heart rate, sweat changes abnormally.

Acupuncture can help with peripheral neuropathy, by improving blood supply to the nerves, reducing inflammation and increasing nerve conductivity.

Acupuncture helps motor nerve injury recovering

Recent research from China reported the effectiveness of acupuncture for peripheral nerve injury. Xiao GR et al did a control trial study which investigated and compared the effects of acupuncture on peripheral nerve injury with that of function training and no treatment. They recruited 90 patients and allocated them into three groups: acupuncture group, function training group and control group with each group of 30 patients. After three months of treatments basic function, practical function, EMG, nerve conduction velocity were compared among the 3 groups. They found that the acupuncture group achieved the best recovery; the function training group is the second. They suggested that acupuncture plus function training can accelerate nerve repair, promote functional recovery of the muscles.

Another case report was from Millea PJ in Medical College of Wisconsin USA. A 41-year old female with a 1 week history of inability to write or extend the right wrist received 1 session of acupuncture treatment. Wrist motion returned strait away after the treatment. After acupuncture treatment wrist splint was then used. On the same day, the patient reported increasing strength in wrist and finger extension. On the next day, the patient cancelled the second session of acupuncture treatment, because of her hand recovered. 4 month followup found all wrist and finger extension, sensation and return of the brachioradialis reflex were normal. 1 year followup showed fully recovery to normal. Acupuncture potentially facilitates recovery and may accelerate peripheral motor nerve injury recovery. Although evidence that acupuncture is effective for any type of motor nerve injury is limited to case reports and case series, these findings are beneficial.

Common peroneal nerve palsy, acupuncture can help.

Common peroneal nerve palsy is damage to the peroneal nerve which is a branch of the sciatic nerve and supplies movement and sensation to the lower leg, foot and toes. Common peroneal nerve palsy is a type of peripheral neuropathy. This condition can affect people of any age. The peroneal nerve palsy leads to loss of movement or sensation in the foot and leg. There is a loss of feeling, muscle control, muscle tone, and eventual loss of muscle mass because the nerves aren't stimulating the muscles.

The causes include Trauma or injury to the knee, fracture of the fibula (a bone of the lower leg), use of a tight plaster cast (or other long-term constriction) of the lower leg, crossing the legs regularly, regularly wearing high boots, pressure to the knee from positions during deep sleep injury during knee surgery or from being placed in an awkward position during anesthesia, or unknown reasons. People who have diabetes or exposed certain toxins are in high risk.

The symptoms include decreased sensation, numbness, or tingling in the top of the foot or outer part of the upper or lower leg, foot drops, walking problems including slapping gait and toes drag while walking, weakness of the ankles or feet. Examination shows Loss of muscle control in the lower legs and feet, atrophy of the foot or leg muscles, difficulty lifting up the foot and toes and making toe out movements. Nerve conduction tests show reduced conduction velocity.

Treatments including surgery, physiotherapy etc are aimed for improving mobility and independence. Acupuncture helps improve recovery of peroneal nerve function and increase nerve conductivity. Acupuncture can also reduce pain caused to nerve injury.

References
Chen YL Journal of Chinese integrative medicine (2009), 7:273
Ji XQ Zhen ci yan jiu (2010), 35; 443-7
Tong Y J Acupunct Meridian Stud. (2010) 3:95-103.
Millea PJ J Altern Complement Med (2005) 11: 167-9
King JC. Peroneal neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal disorders, pain and rehabilitation. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2008:chap 66.
Yao ZH et al J Tradit Chin Med (1984) 4:97-100
Xiao GR et al Zhongguo Zhen Jiu (2007) 27:329-32
Garrow AP et al Acupunct Med (2014) Mar 21. doi: 10.1136/acupmed-2013-010495